Old Coppernose – Quantitative easing, the medieval way

In 1526 and Henry VIII was King. He needed money to pay for the wars against Scotland and France. 
His Chancellor, Cardinal Wolsey, decided to debase the coinage (mix the precious metals of silver and gold with cheaper ones) so that he could make more coins for the same amount of precious metal and therefore mint more money at less cost.

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Sir Isaac Newton – did you know?

Sir Isaac Newton. From a portrait by Kneller in 1689

Isaac Newton was appointed Master of the Mint between 1699-1727.

The title ‘Master of the Mint’ is held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer who, at the time of writing, is The Right Honourable George Osborne.

Isaac Newton is the most famous ‘Master of the Mint’ in our history – here are ten relatively little known facts about him:

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Remembrance Day – the powerful moment and poppies

The powerful moment that is the Two Minute Silence began on the first anniversary of Armistice Day, 11 November 1919.

The War Cabinet discussed it on 5 November and approved a ‘Service of Silence’ on Armistice Day. The only amendment they made was to the duration, to one minute, subject to approval from King George V. Lord Milner drafted a ‘personal request’ for the King and took it to Buckingham Palace. However, The King altered the duration of the silence back to two minutes and the announcement was carried by all national newspapers on 7 November 1919.

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The Royal Mint at the time of Guy Fawkes

Most people know the story of Guy Fawkes and the gunpowder plot, but fewer know about the connection it has to The Royal Mint.

Guy Fawkes was interrogated, and tortured, in the Queen’s House which is inside The Tower of London on Tower Green. Tower Green was the scene of many grisly events throughout history including the beheading of Ann Boleyn.  At the time of Guy Fawke’s interrogation, The Royal Mint was located within the walls of the Tower of London. Today, The Royal Mint is based on a highly secure site at the small town of Llantrisant in South Wales.

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The Sovereign in the modern age

Respected, and recognised all over the world, the Sovereign became synonymous with Britain herself. 

At the turn of the century it was one of the world’s most trusted and respected coins. Yet even the Sovereign could not fail to be shaken by a conflict as devastating as the First World War which saw the end of the Sovereign as a coin in daily circulation. Production of Sovereigns in Great Britain almost stopped from 1917, only recommencing briefly in 1925. The coin would not be issued in great numbers again until 1957.

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The history of UK Bullion Coins – Sovereign and Britannia

The history of UK Bullion Coins – Sovereign and Britannia

Although The Royal Mint is enjoying a new focus on bullion, UK bullion coins have hundreds of years of history.

The Royal Mint’s 1,100 year history of producing fine coins make it uniquely placed to offer bullion buyers the security and reassurance that they demand.

The origin of UK bullion, The Gold Sovereign

Quality assured by Act of Parliament, the first gold Sovereign was struck in 1489 by order of King Henry VII and took its name from the regal portrait of the Monarch that appeared on its obverse – a tradition that is observed to this day.

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The Ultimate Royalist

Now that the excitement of the Diamond Jubilee weekend is beginning to fade, the thoughts of everyone at The Royal Mint begin to turn to the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games.

However, we still want to keep the Diamond Jubilee buzz going a little longer…so if you haven’t yet seen the announcement of the Ultimate Royalist competition winners, check out The Ultimate Royalist webpage for details!

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The Diamond Jubilee – part of Royal Mint history, part of Britain’s history…

A Diamond Jubilee is truly special. In Britain’s long history there has only ever been one before now, that of Queen Victoria, the Queen’s great-great-grandmother.

Queen Victoria’s own Diamond Jubilee in 1897 symbolises the spirit of national pride that is still enjoyed on momentous Royal occasions today.

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Maundy Money

Maundy Money

Maundy Money is one of many ancient traditions The Royal Mint is proud to be a part of. It is a Christian tradition that involves giving special coins to people who have done good work for their Church and community It seems to have been the custom as early as the thirteenth century for members … Read more…

Diamond Jubilee sweepstake – the winners

Diamond Jubilee sweepstake – the winners

We had over 500 entries to our Diamond Jubilee sweepstake, and did you know 95% of entrants feel that The Royal Mint makes the best coins in the world!

I hope you weren’t just saying that because you wanted to win!

If you didn’t win, the coin is still available from The Royal Mint’s secure website – Buy the Diamond Jubilee Silver Crown

So who won?

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