The Rising Years of Queen Anne – Making of a Monarch

The second part of our series on the life of Queen Anne looks into the events during the early years of her reign. If you missed part one you can read it here.

Anne ascended the throne on 8th March 1702 following the death of her unpopular brother-in-law, William of Orange. He had shared the throne with Anne’s sister Mary since 1689, and had inherited it for life following Mary’s death in 1694. He and Mary had no children so Anne was the undisputed heiress to the throne following his death in 1702. In contrast to many Kings and Queens before her, Anne came to the throne peacefully…

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Life Inside The Royal Mint – History & treasures surround us!

It’s hard to be brief about the treasures held safely for the nation behind the anonymous door that opens to The Royal Mint Museum, but I’m going to try, so here are some snippets:

cabinetThe Museum holds a cabinet said to be Sir Isaac Newton’swhen he was Master of the Mint from 1699-1727; pistols from the Tower of London that provided the security of those times and literally thousands of coins from all over the world. Plasters of coins and medals from the late 19th Century, wax impressions of the Great Seals of the Realm and other official Seals from the start of the 20th century, are all preserved here.

One of the great treasures, the Waterloo Medal Roll, lists the names of all those who fought at the Battle of Waterloo. Medal-making is an area of our work that is perhaps not very well-known. It began here in 1817 when we made the Waterloo Medals, and continues to this day with production of medals for the Armed Forces and many other organisations.

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Royalty and St George & The Dragon – The Top 10 Facts

I’ve felt surrounded by Georges and Dragons lately! So my friends in our Museum have helped me pull together these Top 10 Facts about them, that I think you really need to know…

  1. Our flagship coin, the Sovereign, is known and recognised throughout the world. It’s our most famous coin and shows St George, the patron saint of England for more than 650 years. We are thrilled that in 2013 this is a real tribute to the new Royal baby Prince George!
  2. The legend of St George and the Dragon symbolises the triumph of good over evil. It’s been familiar for many centuries, for instance in colourful wall paintings in medieval churches and on the badges of pilgrims.
  3. The St George and the Dragon design by Benedetto Pistrucci was first used on gold Sovereigns in 1817. His neo-classical depiction is a masterpiece and has appeared on the coinage of every British monarch since George III, with the single exception of William IV (1830-1837).
  4. The Royal Birth £5 Crown is the first time in over 100 years that Pistrucci’s St George and the Dragon has appeared on a silver crown. It was last seen on a silver coin for the Coronation year of Edward VII in 1902.
  5. St George and the Dragon first appeared on the English coinage in the reign of King Henry VIII. These ‘George nobles’ are very rare and much desired by collectors.
  6. Six Kings have been named George, the first four reigning in succession from 1714 to 1830. George V was The Queen’s grandfather and George VI was her father, who died in 1952. Only Henry and Edward have featured more frequently as Kings’ names, both appearing eight times.
  7. George V was the founder of the Windsor Dynasty in 1917. He used a version of St George and the Dragon for his Silver Jubilee crown in 1935.
  8. With the personal approval of George VI (The Queen’s father) a version of Pistrucci’s design was used for the centre of the George Cross, Britain’s highest civilian award for gallantry. At the same time another version of St George and the Dragon was used for the reverse of the George Medal, based on the bookplate used in the Royal Library at Windsor.
  9. St George and the Dragon also appeared in 1663 in the design on the reverse of the famous petition crown of Charles II (now on loan from our own collection to the exhibition at the Tower of London).
  10. St George and the Dragon is also familiar as the badge of the Order of the Garter, Britain’s oldest order of chivalry dating back over 650 years to the reign of Edward III. The link with the Royal Family is emphasised by the location of St George’s Chapel within the walls of Windsor Castle.

I hope you now feel much more enlightened about St George, his Dragon and how they relate to sovereigns and Sovereign coins!

To see the 2013 range of gold Sovereigns featuring the original Pistrucci design, take a look at The Royal Mint’s website

A badge of honour – our pride in making medals at The Royal Mint

Maybe we’ve been too modest about our medal making, or maybe we’ve just been doing it for so long that it’s become second nature to us, but our part in making the first batch of Arctic Star medals and Bomber Command clasps has inspired us to share some lesser-known information about this part of our business.

The medals are produced by a dedicated ‘Medal Cell’, staffed by highly skilled craftsmen and women who all have an inspiring passion for their work. The Royal Mint liaises directly with the diverse organisations that award the medals. On occasion we are honoured to deal directly with the Queen or Prince Philip, both of whom take a keen interest in medals. Our Museum also holds historic documents and artefacts that add fascinating background to the story of medals at The Royal Mint. You can find out more about that on The Royal Mint Museum website.

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Medals, old coins, new coins are forever, keep them beautiful forever

If you’ve ever won a medal, been awarded a Military or Royal Honour or own a beautiful coin, you will undoubtedly want to keep it looking as beautiful as the day you proudly acquired it.

But now you and Usain Bolt, Mo Farah, thousands of military and civilian heroes and others have a problem in common – how to keep that precious and beautiful piece of metallic art sparkling.
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The Olympic and Paralympic victory medals – the facts behind the medals

Lots of people are talking about the Olympic and Paralympic medals, and the questions seem to focus on the same issues. What are they made of? What are they worth? How many are there?

Well, we made them, so who better to clear this up once and for all? With pleasure, we present, the facts behind the medals!
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The Royal Mint welcomes Cheryl Gillan as she visits Welsh businesses getting set for London 2012

Staff at The Royal Mint welcomed the secretary of State for Wales, Cheryl Gillan, yesterday as she visited the highly secure manufacturing site as part of her tour of businesses, specialists and elite athletes all involved in the mission to bring Olympic and Paralympic glory to Wales.

Following a recent trade visit to South East Asia where she witnessed the signing of a £6m deal between The Royal Mint and the Thailand Treasury, the Welsh Secretary was back in South Wales and had the opportunity to view the striking of the Paralympic medals at The Royal Mint in Llantrisant.

Cheryl Gillan, Charlotte Beard and Nathan Stephens admire a Paralympic medal

Cheryl Gillan, Charlotte Beard and Nathan Stephens admire a Paralympic medal

Mrs Gillan was joined by Paralympic athlete Nathan Stephens and National Performance Manager Anthony Hughes for a visit to The Royal Mint where the production of the Paralympic medals was underway, before visiting Bridgend-based Olympic supplier First4Numbers.

Speaking about her visits, Mrs Gillan said:

I am delighted to be able to witness first-hand the extraordinary hard work and dedication going on out on the track, in the gym and behind the scenes to make the 2012 Games a success here in Wales. It is also encouraging that businesses in Wales are benefitting from the Games and are helping to inspire other businesses to showcase their wares on the international stage.

This is an exciting year for the whole of the UK with both the Olympic Games and the Diamond Jubilee taking place and all nations have an opportunity to shine. Wales surpassed expectations at the 2008 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Beijing and this tenacious spirit that will serve us well at the 2012 Games.

The Welsh athletes taking part in the Games are inspiring a new generation not just to get involved in sports, but also to work hard to reach their goals. I wish everyone involved in brining even more sporting glory to Wales the very best of luck.

Vin Wijeratne, Director of Finance at The Royal Mint said:

In this celebratory year when the eyes of the world turn to the United Kingdom I am delighted to welcome the Secretary of State to The Royal Mint.

We are immensely proud and honoured to be able to strike and handcraft each of the 4,700 Olympic and Paralympic victory medals. More than 800 local people are employed by The Royal Mint, and now each one will be able to tell their grandchildren that they, and South Wales, had a hand in creating a piece of Olympic history.