The Sovereign in the modern age

Respected, and recognised all over the world, the Sovereign became synonymous with Britain herself. 

At the turn of the century it was one of the world’s most trusted and respected coins. Yet even the Sovereign could not fail to be shaken by a conflict as devastating as the First World War which saw the end of the Sovereign as a coin in daily circulation. Production of Sovereigns in Great Britain almost stopped from 1917, only recommencing briefly in 1925. The coin would not be issued in great numbers again until 1957.
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Old name, new money – The Sovereign returns

The guinea was the major coin of the eighteenth century, but during the long war with France the banks began to issue notes in place of coins.

The issuing of bank notes helped Britain to pay for its long war, but it caused inflation and national insecurity and a spate of forgeries took hold. You can view many of the old records of cases brought at the time on The Old Bailey website.

Following the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815 the decision was taken to undertake a ‘great reform of the coinage’. Gold was adopted as the ‘sole Standard Measure of Value’ and bank notes were taken out of use.
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The first sovereign – a coin designed to impress

In a new weekly series of articles focused on bringing The Royal Mint’s history to life, we focus on our flagship coin, the sovereign.

The original sovereign was struck on the 28 October 1489 by The Royal Mint in the Tower of London.

The Sovereign of 1489

The Sovereign of 1489

Henry VII ordered the striking of the largest gold coin yet issued in England. The King wished to issue them as gifts to foreign dignitaries to impress upon them the strength of the Tudor dynasty.

He would have had no idea that the coin he issued would, in time, become renowned around the world.
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The history of UK Bullion Coins – Sovereign and Britannia

Although The Royal Mint is enjoying a new focus on bullion, UK bullion coins have hundreds of years of history.

The Royal Mint’s 1,100 year history of producing fine coins make it uniquely placed to offer bullion buyers the security and reassurance that they demand.

The origin of UK bullion, The Gold Sovereign

Quality assured by Act of Parliament, the first gold Sovereign was struck in 1489 by order of King Henry VII and took its name from the regal portrait of the Monarch that appeared on its obverse – a tradition that is observed to this day.
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