2013 coin packs now available at RoyalMint.com

The first few packs from the 2013 coin range are now available at The Royal Mint website.

2013 is another huge year for Britain, with the Queen’s Coronation, the 150th Anniversary of the London  Underground, the 30th Anniversary of the £1 coin and the 350th Anniversary of the Guinea amongst other landmarks!

Read more…

Remembrance Day – the powerful moment and poppies

The powerful moment that is the Two Minute Silence began on the first anniversary of Armistice Day, 11 November 1919.

The War Cabinet discussed it on 5 November and approved a ‘Service of Silence’ on Armistice Day. The only amendment they made was to the duration, to one minute, subject to approval from King George V. Lord Milner drafted a ‘personal request’ for the King and took it to Buckingham Palace. However, The King altered the duration of the silence back to two minutes and the announcement was carried by all national newspapers on 7 November 1919.

Read more…

Medals, old coins, new coins are forever, keep them beautiful forever

If you’ve ever won a medal, been awarded a Military or Royal Honour or own a beautiful coin, you will undoubtedly want to keep it looking as beautiful as the day you proudly acquired it.

But now you and Usain Bolt, Mo Farah, thousands of military and civilian heroes and others have a problem in common – how to keep that precious and beautiful piece of metallic art sparkling.

Read more…

The Royal Mint at the time of Guy Fawkes

Most people know the story of Guy Fawkes and the gunpowder plot, but fewer know about the connection it has to The Royal Mint.

Guy Fawkes was interrogated, and tortured, in the Queen’s House which is inside The Tower of London on Tower Green. Tower Green was the scene of many grisly events throughout history including the beheading of Ann Boleyn.  At the time of Guy Fawke’s interrogation, The Royal Mint was located within the walls of the Tower of London. Today, The Royal Mint is based on a highly secure site at the small town of Llantrisant in South Wales.

Read more…

The Sovereign in the modern age

Respected, and recognised all over the world, the Sovereign became synonymous with Britain herself. 

At the turn of the century it was one of the world’s most trusted and respected coins. Yet even the Sovereign could not fail to be shaken by a conflict as devastating as the First World War which saw the end of the Sovereign as a coin in daily circulation. Production of Sovereigns in Great Britain almost stopped from 1917, only recommencing briefly in 1925. The coin would not be issued in great numbers again until 1957.

Read more…

Old name, new money – The Sovereign returns

The guinea was the major coin of the eighteenth century, but during the long war with France the banks began to issue notes in place of coins.

The issuing of bank notes helped Britain to pay for its long war, but it caused inflation and national insecurity and a spate of forgeries took hold. You can view many of the old records of cases brought at the time on The Old Bailey website.

Following the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815 the decision was taken to undertake a ‘great reform of the coinage’. Gold was adopted as the ‘sole Standard Measure of Value’ and bank notes were taken out of use.

Read more…

The first sovereign – a coin designed to impress

The first sovereign – a coin designed to impress

In a new weekly series of articles focused on bringing The Royal Mint’s history to life, we focus on our flagship coin, the sovereign.

The original sovereign was struck on the 28 October 1489 by The Royal Mint in the Tower of London.

The Sovereign of 1489
The Sovereign of 1489

Henry VII ordered the striking of the largest gold coin yet issued in England. The King wished to issue them as gifts to foreign dignitaries to impress upon them the strength of the Tudor dynasty.

He would have had no idea that the coin he issued would, in time, become renowned around the world.

Read more…

The Royal Mint Pinterest page keeps growing!

Since we last mentioned Pinterest The Royal Mint’s page has gone from strength to strength.

We now have boards covering a range of topics that relate to The Royal Mint and we are adding new ones all the time. Below you can see a selection of pins from our “Your Olympic and Paralympic 50p Collections” board. These are all pictures that people have tweeted @royalmintuk – have you tweeted yours?

Read more…

The Olympic circulation 50p – the FREE collectable for London 2012

The 2012 Olympic Games held in London this summer have evoked feelings of excitement across the country. To celebrate this occasion, The Royal Mint released a set of commemorative 50 pence pieces for the public to collect.

In recognition of the national pride which the Games inspire, we decided to fully involve the public in the release by giving YOU the opportunity to design the coins. The competition was launched nationwide in 2009, giving people of all ages and professions the chance to design the reverse side of 29 sports-themed coins. This was the first time the Royal Mint had ever asked members of the public to design a coin!

Read more…